The Strange Ways That Celebrities Are Getting Out the Vote

Emilee Geist

Tyler, the Creator’s phone camera appeared to be smudged. He had aimed his lens up his nostrils. He seemed to be sweating. “I know I’m the last person y’all should ever take advice from,” the 29-year-old rapper told his fans in a video posted to Instagram and Twitter. “But I’m reiterating what everyone else is saying. Please, please, if you’re young, and your fucking back don’t hurt, go to the polls and cast a fucking vote.”

Stylistically, this was a typically scruffy and profane message for an artist whose signature chorus goes, “Kill people, burn shit, fuck school.” Substance-wise, it seemed to make him squirm. In the past, Tyler said in the video, he “didn’t give a fuck about none of this shit”—politics—“just like a lot of y’all … But I see the light.” He wants follow-through for the Black Lives Matter movement. He wants more arts education in schools.

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9 ways to give yourself a 2nd COVID stimulus check

Emilee Geist

9 ways to give yourself a 2nd COVID stimulus check
9 ways to give yourself a 2nd COVID stimulus check

As you wait to find out whether you’re getting more COVID-19 relief money from the government, the negotiations in Washington have become a soap opera.

The U.S. House — which is run by Democrats —this month passed another coronavirus relief package, including a second round of those $1,200 “stimulus checks” to help family budgets and stimulate the economy.

But, following his hospitalization for COVID, President Donald Trump said the White House was breaking off talks with the Democrats.

A few days later, he indicated the bargaining was back on. Still, the Republican leader in the Senate says it’s “unlikely” there will be any deal between the two parties before the election.

Had enough? If you could use another $1,200 right now, don’t wait around for Washington to get its act together. Here are nine ways to find sources of cash

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9 ways to give yourself a coronavirus stimulus payment

Emilee Geist

9 ways to give yourself a coronavirus stimulus payment
9 ways to give yourself a coronavirus stimulus payment

As you wait to find out whether you’re getting more COVID-19 relief money from the government, the negotiations in Washington have become a soap opera.

The U.S. House — which is run by Democrats —this month passed another coronavirus relief package, including a second round of those $1,200 “stimulus checks” to help family budgets and stimulate the economy.

But, following his hospitalization for COVID, President Donald Trump said the White House was breaking off talks with the Democrats.

A few days later, he indicated the bargaining was back on. Still, the Republican leader in the Senate says it’s “unlikely” there will be any deal between the two parties before the election.

Had enough? If you could use another $1,200 right now, don’t wait around for Washington to get its act together. Here are 10 ways to find sources of cash and

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Great Ways to Earn Extra Cash in Retirement | Second Careers

Emilee Geist

Bringing in a few more dollars each month can make a difference, especially if you’re living on a fixed budget. Finding ways to earn extra cash in retirement often takes a bit of time and creativity.

Here are some ideas to make money in retirement:

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  • Assist the elderly.
  • Share your vehicle.
  • Put pictures up for sale.
  • Care for pets.
  • Fix and resell items.
  • Help with websites.
  • Assist local sports.
  • Assemble furniture.
  • Volunteer to get connected.
  • Babysit.
  • Deliver items.
  • Sell at a farmers market.
  • Start a gardening service.
  • Offer handyman services.
  • Work at an apartment community.
  • Be a notary.
  • Do graphic design work.
  • Tutor students.
  • Be a mock juror.
  • Help with research.
  • Be a local tour guide.
  • Sell jewelry.
  • Use these ideas to help you start upping your retirement income.

    Declutter and Sell

    Old phones, used bikes, electronics and any other gear you no longer use can be posted

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    8 Ways to Make Money Playing Video Games

    Emilee Geist

    Parents tend to worry when their offspring are so enthralled by video games they spend much of their free time up in their room, not studying or reading but playing online. But did you know there are ways to make money playing video games? 

    Your kids probably do. 

    Take for example, PewDiePie – they all know who he is. They may not know his real name is Felix Arvid Ulf Kjellberg. And they may not know his net worth is estimated at between $14.5 million and $30 million. But they know he is the most famous ‘YouTuber’ ever. 

    Most people can’t make as much as PewDiePie has, because he started doing it back when few people even knew money could be made playing video games. But, just because you or your offspring won’t likely become the next most famous YouTuber, doesn’t mean there isn’t money to be made. 

    How to

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    Here are ways to make the most out of a less-than-perfect job

    Emilee Geist

    If you’ve smacked into a plateau, you’re not alone. According to research published by Gallup last fall, only 40 percent of American workers said they’re in good jobs.

    Add the pandemic to the mix, and things have only gotten worse. A poll by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, an independent nonpartisan research institution, in June revealed that only 14 percent of Americans are happy — a five-decade low.

    But, it doesn’t have to be that way. These authors weigh in on how you can make the most out of a ho-hum role to not only survive, but thrive, even in a so-called dead-end job.

    Define joy, find meaning

    Carson Tate, author of “Own It. Love It. Make It Work: How To Make Any Job Your Dream Job” (McGraw-Hill Education, out Oct. 6), said employees should identify what they need to be more fulfilled, stimulated

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    3 Best Ways to Diversify Your Income (and Stop Living Paycheck to Paycheck) During Times of Uncertainty

    Emilee Geist

    Side hustles might just get you through these economic tough times.


    7 min read

    Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


    Making money is tough. There is no denying that trying to dig yourself out of the minimum wage rut that most of us find ourselves in can be hard, but it’s not impossible. 

    Almost all of us have found ourselves stuck at some point in our lives, existing paycheck to paycheck, hoping that somehow we can gain enough experience to haul ourselves from minimum wage struggle to comfortable living. In fact, over 12 million people in the U.S. are living in poverty despite working full time, according to PolicyLink, an organization that advances racial and economic equity. Even before the pandemic, 78 percent of all workers were living paycheck to paycheck, CareerBuilder found in a 2017 study. 

    If you’re tired of spending your days weighing

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    16 Ways Online Retailers Are Tricking You During Quarantine

    Emilee Geist

    When COVID-19 lockdowns started in March and brick-and-mortar stores became mostly off-limits, consumers flocked to shop online, driving a monumental growth spurt in online spending.  According to data from the U.S. Department of Commerce, e-commerce sales grew more than 30% between the first and second quarters of 2020; in the second quarter of 2020, Americans spent $211.5 billion online. Though panic buying and other consumer trends — like spending more time on social media — were largely responsible for the surge in online spending, e-retailers were quick to pull out tricks — or dark patterns — to lure shoppers into spending more.

    “A dark pattern is a design practice that is intentionally created to mislead a user or have them do something that they wouldn’t normally do,” said Tyler Andersen, senior product designer at ConsumerTrack.

    While many of these dark patterns — like cross-selling and targeted ads — are not

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    Online learning during COVID-19: 8 ways universities can improve equity and access

    Emilee Geist

    This summer, universities around the world planned for an unprecedented back-to-school in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. In most universities, centres of teaching and learning are responsible for supporting faculty members’ teaching for more effective student learning and a high quality of education.

    Our collaborative research group, based at Université Laval, Concordia University, Florida State University, University of Southern California and San Francisco State University, sought to better understand how universities planned to make sure all students would have access to online learning and be able to participate as courses moved online. Our team met remotely with staff from 19 centres in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, France and Lebanon.

    We analyzed publicly shared resources from 78 centres in 23 countries about about how instructors could transform online learning during COVID-19. We also compiled publicly available resources from these centres about ways to address educational equity in

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    6 Ways To Support COVID-Weary Employees

    Emilee Geist

    by Dina Gerdeman

    The COVID-19 pandemic continues to rock the workplace with no end in sight, leaving business leaders to struggle with a wide variety of challenges, including keeping staff members happily engaged—and employed.

    To make sense of the pandemic’s impact on workers—both on their day-to-day roles, as well as their mental well-being—a forthcoming article in American Psychologist examines current organizational psychology research to help business leaders manage COVID-related fallout in the workplace and develop solutions to ease the stress many employees are experiencing.

    “We live in an incredibly interconnected global community. So disease threats such as COVID-19 need to be recognized as part of the current work-scape and systematically addressed,” says Harvard Business School Assistant Professor of Business Administration Ashley Whillans, who co-authored the article, “COVID-19

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