Surviving Halloween during COVID-19

Emilee Geist

Halloween has always been a loved and cherished holiday where we go door to door saying trick-or-treat without a second thought. But now, sadly, this is not possible. Because of COVID-19, many people would be much too uncomfortable with this beloved tradition as it usually is celebrated. But all is not lost, as we can still safely celebrate “Allhallows Eve” from home with new and fun activities. We’ve gathered ideas to show you how we can still enjoy Halloween during the pandemic.



diagram: Instead of giving candy out by hand, how about by fishing pole," says iGeneration Youth reporter, Jack Kupper. "Clip candy to the end of a toy fishing pole and “go fishing” by putting it into the kiddies’ buckets. Perhaps the candy could be Swedish Fish? This way, you can stay 6 feet away while still handing out candy and smiles.


© Logan van Zyl/iGeneration Youth/TNS
Instead of giving candy out by hand, how about by fishing pole,” says iGeneration Youth reporter, Jack Kupper. “Clip candy to the end of a toy fishing pole and “go fishing” by putting it into the kiddies’ buckets. Perhaps the candy could be Swedish Fish? This way, you can stay 6 feet away while still handing out candy and smiles.

1. With an adult’s help, grab that carving knife! Whether you purchase pumpkins at a patch or the grocery store, you can dice-and-slice and create funny or scary faces just like you always have. Throw a carving party with family and close friends and see who can make the best design. Bonus points if you can make a really good one without a stencil! Turn on some spooky tunes to set the mood, too.

2. Halloween-themed baking. It’s like an early Christmas! Instead of red and green and Santa Claus, get or make some orange and black frosting to set the theme and decorate cookies with designs like black cats or ghosts! If you have extra, you can “boo” your friends and neighbors in your neighborhood by leaving small bags of cookies at their doors and ringing the doorbell before dashing away! Be as sneaky as possible to make sure no one sees you, as that would spoil the fun. ?

3. Easter eggs aren’t just for springtime! Decorate fall-colored plastic eggs in a ghostly style and stuff them with candy. Hide them around your yard and invite your friends to come at coordinated times, keeping in mind the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved social distancing. Perhaps some of the treats could be inside of a couple of pumpkins (make sure there are no lit candles). Watch from the window as they hunt with the haunted glow of their flashlight!

4. Have a costume contest online. We’ve always done it, but never like this! Dress up as your favorite characters or just be something silly. Go on a Zoom call and see each other’s getup! Vote on who has the best or most creative ones and award prizes to the winners!

5. Take a virtual tour of a haunted house! YouTube has many of these, and they can be pretty spooky. Real haunted houses in other nations could be fun as well. Look for video tours of old abandoned castles on the internet. Maybe you’ll see a ghost; who knows, but there’s only one way to find out.

6. On Halloween night, have a spooky movie marathon with your family. Or keep it homie with some all-time classics like “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” or a Scooby-Doo movie. Extra points if you make it through without screaming!

Gallery: 30 Not-So-Spooky Halloween Books For Tots (PopSugar)

7. String a clothesline in your driveway and tie small white treat bags to it for kids to take on the night of October 31. Maybe make one the “jackpot” with a few more treats than the rest. Make the bags look like ghosts or some other spooky creatures!

8. Instead of giving candy out by hand, how about by fishing pole? Clip candy to the end of a toy fishing pole and “go fishing” by putting it into the kiddies’ buckets. Perhaps the candy could be Swedish Fish? This way, you can stay six feet away while still handing out candy and smiles.

9. Since masks are everywhere now, why not roll with it on Halloween night? Decorate or create a mask that not only meets official CDC recommendations, but matches your costume.

10. Try Halloween in reverse! Walk around your neighborhood with the people you live with and leave fun notes on your neighbors’ porches or doors. Tell that nice man across the street how much his smiles have meant to your family during quarantine, or how pretty you think someone’s yard is. Tie a treat to the notes and see how much people like them. Spread some Halloween joy!

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ABOUT THE WRITER

Jack Kupper is an iGeneration Youth reporter living in Arizona.

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©2020 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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