Company makes delicious-looking treats, but don’t eat them!

Emilee Geist

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — In this week’s “Nevada Built,” 13 Action News Anchor Todd Quinines introduces you to a company focused on delivering a wow effect. But some may find it a bit confusing because looks can be deceiving. The company’s success comes with bringing joy to getting clean. VEGAN-FRIENDLY […]

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — In this week’s “Nevada Built,” 13 Action News Anchor Todd Quinines introduces you to a company focused on delivering a wow effect. But some may find it a bit confusing because looks can be deceiving. The company’s success comes with bringing joy to getting clean.

VEGAN-FRIENDLY SOAP WITH STYLE

It looks like a bakery that could be run by Willy Wonka, but nothing inside Nectar Bath Treats is edible. All of it is soap.

“If you’re going to make a soap in Las Vegas, you got to do it with style,” said 13 Action News Anchor Todd Quinones.

“You got to do it with style and fun and entertain whoever is going to use it,” said the Nevada Built company’s CEO and co-founder, Tom Taicher.

Taicher is turning soap into an experience using plant-based ingredients like coffee and poppy seeds.

The ingredients are pressed into molds and giving them the appearance of everything from chocolate hearts to cupcakes.

“Everything is handmade, delightful product, careful ingredients that we use,” said Taicher.

RAISING THE STANDARDS

With his entrepreneurial eye, Taicher came to the U.S. from Israel about 17 years ago looking for an opportunity.

He discovered the original Nectar Bath Treats store inside the Venetian in 2015 and decided to turn it into a franchise, investing in brick-and-mortar retail locations despite what the critics thought.

“Everyone talked about retail that is dying. Amazon will kill it. The online will crush it. And I thought, no, you just need to raise the standards. Retail needs to deliver a better customer experience,” he said.

At its stores, Nectar Bath Treats customers are encouraged to try the products.

Take, for instance, the whipped soap.

“Can I ask you a favor? Could you put some, just a little bit on my hand, just so I could feel the texture?” asked Todd, experiencing the whipped soap first hand. “See, that is wild. It kind of has that whipped quality, which is so strange. It is so cool.”

“Now imagine when you wash it all over your body; elbows, shoulders, knees, especially with your feet. Your skin is going to feel soft and smooth like you never felt before,” said Taicher.

“And it smells fantastic too. I love the colors. OK, now going to wash right?” asked Todd.

“Yes,” said Taicher.

FROM MUNDANE HYGIENE TO UNIQUE TREAT

And that’s the point. Turning mundane hygiene into a joyful, unique treat. Especially for kids, including his own.

“Every time that I buy ice cream for my daughter, you know, I feel guilty about that. This is something that it’s like, it’s good for your soul. It’s good for your body. It’s good for the mind,” said Taicher.

The products are not meant for everyday use. The company’s very popular milkshake bath soaks cost $35.

“How many baths would this be?” asked Todd.

“Four to five servings,” said Taicher.

HEART OF NECTAR

Nectar now has nine locations and 167 employees. Employees, Taicher describes as the heart of Nectar.

“We believe if we’re going to care about them, show them love, they’re going to create a product that, you know, is made with love,” said Taicher.

“Like you said, made with love and Nevada Built,” said Todd.

“Yes,” said Taicher.

“That’s a great combination,” said Todd.

Nectar has several shops on the Las Vegas Strip and others in California, with more planned for Hawaii and even overseas in Poland and Dubai.

The company is also hiring for positions in a number of different departments.

Learn more about the company at NectarUSA.com

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