Why Singapore turned to wearable contact-tracing tech

Singapore’s TraceTogether Tokens are the latest effort to tackle Covid-19 with tech. But they have also reignited a privacy debate.

The wearable devices complement the island’s existing contact-tracing app, to identify people who might have been infected by those who have tested positive for the virus.

All users have to do is carry one, and the battery lasts up to nine months without needing a recharge – something one expert said had “stunned” him.

The government agency which developed the devices acknowledges that the Tokens – and technology in general – aren’t “a silver bullet”, but should augment human contact-tracers’ efforts.

The first to receive the devices are thousands of vulnerable elderly people who don’t own smartphones.

To do so, they had to provide their national ID and phone numbers – TraceTogether app users recently had to start doing likewise.

If dongle users test positive for the disease, they have

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From Meat Smokers to Boombox Speakers, These Are the Products We’re Using This Summer

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We may be celebrating summer a little differently (nay, distantly) this year, but just because we can’t get to the beach or turn up at a tailgate right now, doesn’t mean we can’t take advantage of the sunshine and warmer temps at home.

Whether you’re an aspiring grill-master or looking to upgrade your outdoor tech, we’ve found some of the best new products for your backyard, pool and patio. Pick these items up online now to inject a healthy dose of fun into your summer — and into the (potentially) long months ahead.

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BEST SMOKER: Traeger Ironwood Series 885 Pellet Grill

There’s nothing this (gentle) beast of a machine can’t take on, from ribs to roasts and everything in between. Boasting a massive 885 square-inches of cooking space (enough for ten whole chickens or seven full racks of

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Yoox Net-a-Porter CEO Federico Marchetti, E-Commerce Pioneer, on the State of Shopping

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One business’s loss is another’s gain. When Covid-19 forced brick-and-mortar shops to close their doors this spring, a boom in online sales ensued. As a pioneer of online shopping, Federico Marchetti, CEO and chairman of Yoox Net-a-Porter Group, was well-equipped to navigate the sea change. In 2000, Marchetti founded Yoox, one of the first online-only shopping destinations, and in 2015, he drove a merger with Net-a-Porter to create the e-commerce titan that he leads today.

Marchetti is credited with introducing a number of e-tail practices that are now industry standards—from creating digital flagships for marquee brands to selling high jewelry and watches online. YNAP group—which comprises Yoox, Net-a-Porter, Mr Porter and The Outnet and was acquired by Richemont in 2018—is the e-commerce market leader, with more than 4.3 million customers in 180 countries and one billion visits to its websites annually.

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Take These Steps for Safe Swimming

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While experts consider waterborne transmission of the novel coronavirus to be unlikely, swimming at the local neighborhood pool or municipal beachfront might not be a simple option.

Some cities have said they’re keeping public pools closed. And in some communities in the U.S., “closed” may mean that a beach or lakefront is accessible but not staffed with lifeguards, so you might not have these professionals watching as you and your family swim. 

Where pools and beaches are open, authorities are likely to be implementing rules designed to limit any potential spread of COVID-19, such as social distancing. That could limit the number of people allowed to swim, shutting some families out. 

To avoid these problems, and provide kids with a way to have some warm-weather fun, some people may be exploring their options for backyard swimming, such as above-ground

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Online games are harming children through gambling and other features, say Lords

Electronic Arts
Electronic Arts

Online games are harming children through the inclusion of gambling and other features, according to a major new report.

Regulators should score new games on the amount of harm they could cause to children and any that score too highly must be not be approved for sale, the report from the House of Lords’ Select Committee on the Social and Economic Impact of the Gambling Industry warns.

It recommends that the Gambling Commission establish the system for testing games, amid fears over the problems that “loot boxes” represent in encouraging children to gamble.

Experts have repeatedly warned that there is not enough protection for children from the feature, and that it could lead to gambling addiction and other societal problems if it is not tackled.

Current testing criteria of new games “astonishingly” do not consider the addictiveness or potential harm that could be caused, the Committee’s report said.

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Crate and Barrel CEO Steps Down, Perigold Adds New Industry Brands, and More News This Week

From significant business changes to noteworthy product launches, there’s always something new happening in the world of design. In this weekly roundup, AD PRO has everything you need to know.

Business

Crate and Barrel CEO Steps Down

Neela Montgomery is officially departing from her role as chief executive officer at Crate and Barrel. Montgomery reportedly told the board of her intention to do so at the end of last year. “It has been a pleasure to lead these amazing brands at Crate and CB2,” Montgomery said in a statement. “We have accelerated their strategic and operational capabilities as a digitally-forward, innovative retailer now positioned for the future. This is a passionate, talented team with a great platform for continued success. I thank them for their commitment and as I take on new challenges, I look forward to seeing their future achievements.” Her last day will be August 1.

Perigold Adds

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How These Top Creatives are Coping with COVID-19

Sir David Adjaye

Accra, Ghana

The pandemic happened to co-incide with the one-year anniversary of my return home to Accra. In many ways, being here in the midst of this global crisis has furthered my process of rediscovery into Ghana’s past and its narratives—both biographical and national—that have inspired my work on the continent and abroad. I chose to take this photograph in Black Star Square because it is not just a symbol or historical ode to the past but a beacon that will speak to a vibrant future as Accra’s infrastructure and cultural fabric continue to evolve.”

<div class="caption"> Emily Ward, Los Angeles </div> <cite class="credit">Carmen-Jean Cluttey</cite>

Emily Ward, Los Angeles

Carmen-Jean Cluttey

Emily Ward

Los Angeles

“My family and I have embraced the chaos of what has become our makeshift playroom, off the kitchen. This pandemic has reminded me that there is nothing more beautiful than function—messy, lived-in, realistic function.”

<div class="caption"> David Cafiero, Manhattan </div> <cite class="credit">Matthew Sandager</cite>

David Cafiero, Manhattan

Matthew Sandager

David Cafiero

Manhattan

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Aid for artists, a new visual award and Miami art talks online

Developer and art collector Martin Margulies’ foundation has announced it will make a significant gift to help artists weather the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Margulies will donate 400 works of art from his extensive collection to national nonprofit organizations that support working artists but have seen donations shrink because of the pandemic. The organizations, which have not yet been identified publicly, can then sell or auction off the pieces to promote, exhibit or otherwise support the artists with whom they work.

The effort will focus on organizations that have been hit the hardest financially, the foundation said.

“These 400 works have been assembled from the early years of my collecting activities,” Margulies said in a statement released by the foundation. “We are happy to be of some help to artists who do not have dealers and need support at this time. All proceeds from the sale of these artworks

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Make Masks Accessories, Not Annoyances

(Bloomberg Opinion) — Why all the fuss about masks? Why won’t people just wear them?

“Masking has become controversial. It shouldn’t be,” former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on “Face the Nation.” To health experts, masks seem like a simple, apolitical precaution. In medical jargon, they’re personal protective equipment, or PPE, like surgeons’ gowns, gloves and face screens. Nobody thinks a doctor, nurse or emergency medical technician is a coward for gearing up.

On the streets of everyday life, however, masks are something more. They aren’t like safety glasses, life preserver vests, or seatbelts — special protection for a limited task in a specialized environment.

Masks are clothing. They cover your body and change how you appear to the world.

Once you understand masks as clothing, the controversy becomes entirely predictable. Clothes don’t just protect us from the elements. They aren’t purely functional. They provide pleasure and

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Get to Know the Designer Creating Upcycled Corsets From Vintage Nike Sweats and Budweiser Towels

Kayla Sade Famurewa of Almost On Time may have never been to fashion school, but she’s quickly proving herself a name to know.

<em>Designer Kayla Sade Famurewa wearing an upcycled Almost On Time corset.</em>
Designer Kayla Sade Famurewa wearing an upcycled Almost On Time corset.

When Kayla Sade Famurewa sold her first upcycled corset — made from thrifted Nike sweats — in April, it wasn’t with the intention to make a name for herself. 

“It was the beginning of the quarantine, and I wanted to make a cozy corset that I would wear around the house with sweatpants,” she tells Fashionista. 

But the San Francisco-based designer’s pieces were too unique to escape notice for long. Made from clothing (and the occasional Budweiser beer towel) she thrifted from local secondhand stores, Famurewa’s unusual corsets immediately stood out from the sea of clothing on Depop, where she first started selling. Her creative project, which she entitled Almost On Time, soon attracted a wide

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